Sylvia Says Goodbye To San Diego

Lisa & Sylvia at Hotel Del Coronado

Lisa & Sylvia at Hotel Del Coronado

October 28, 2013-Sylvia flies home today from San Diego this morning after spending ten days on the road with us.  We had a great time, Sylvia really enjoyed herself.  After we left the Fountain of Youth Spa & RV Park we traveled west to the Viejas Casino, Hotel & Outlet Mall just north of Alpine on I-8.  Shortly after arrival the gals took a shuttle for some shopping, after we all went for dinner at one of the many restaurants in the Casino, we opted for the Buffet, good choice, wine and beer was complementary!  After we visited the Casino and try out the one arm bandits, actually the slots do not have levers anymore.  Our free RV Casino camping was not free but within the budget, my last $1 bill was bet on a $ machine and I won!  I took my $3.50 and claimed victory!

The next day we drove down I-8 and checked into the Oak Creek RV Resort, this is a Sunland Park.  We spent the afternoon in the pool and hot tub under sunny skies and 84F or 30C.  On Sunday Sylvia packed up and we headed into San Diego.  We spent most of the afternoon walking around the Hotel Del Coronado and surrounding community before heading off to the Ramada.  After Mom got checked in we strolled out to the nearby Fisherman’s Landing then said our goodbyes.  We look forward to seeing everyone at Christmas as we are flying home to Surrey for the first time in 6 years, wow how time flys.

Sylvia meets hotel Del Coronado

Sylvia meets hotel Del Coronado


Did you know?

Explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo

Explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo

The recorded history of the San Diego, California, region begins with the first landing by a European in the present state of California and the first European settlement in California, so that San Diego has been described as “the birthplace of California.”  Of course they are talking about the US State of California.

The indigenous Kumeyaay people had been living in the area for at least 12,000 years.  Explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo discovered San Diego Bay in 1542, but it was 200 years before Europeans settled the area.  A fort and mission were established in 1769, which gradually expanded into a settlement under first Spanish and then Mexican rule. The bay and the area of present-day San Diego were given their current name sixty years later by Sebastián Vizcaíno when he was mapping the coastline of Alta California for Spain in 1602.  Vizcaino was a merchant who hoped to establish prosperous colonies. After holding the first Catholic service conducted on California soil on the feast day of San Diego de Alcala, (also the patron saint of his flagship), he renamed the bay.  He left after 10 days and was enthusiastic about its safe harbor, friendly natives, and promising potential as a successful colony.

Mexico prior to the Treaty of Guadalupe

Mexico prior to the Treaty of Guadalupe

In 1821 Mexico ousted the Spanish in the Mexican War for Independence and created the Province of Alta California (now US State of California).  The San Diego Mission was secularized and shut down in 1834 and the land was sold off.  Afterwards 432 residents petitioned the governor to form a pueblo, and Juan María Osuna was elected the first alcalde (‘mayor’), defeating Pío Pico in the vote.  Beyond town Mexican land grants expanded the number of California Ranchos that modestly added to the local economy.  The original town of San Diego was located at the foot of Presidio Hill, in the area which is now Old Town San Diego State Historic Park.  Unfortunately the location was not ideal, being several miles away from navigable water. Imported goods and exports (primarily tallow and hides) had to be carried over the La Playa Trail to the anchorages in Point Loma.  This arrangement was suitable only for a very small town.  In 1830 the population was about 600; in 1838 the town lost its pueblo status because of its dwindling population, estimated as 100 to 150 residents.

Alta California became part of the United States in 1848 following the U.S. victory in the Mexican-American War and the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.  The resident “Californios” became American citizens with full voting rights however their interests were largely pushed aside by an influx of settlers during the Gold Rush years later.  California was admitted to the Union as a state in 1850. San Diego, still little more than a village, was incorporated as a city and was named the county seat of the newly established San Diego County.  

Sylvia on Fisherman's landing

Sylvia on Fisherman’s Landing

Gallery

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